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Museum Learning Summit

Programme

Choose Day

Day One: 16 July 2024

All times shown are BST (Time in London)

12:00 (BST)

Child-led play at the National Museum of Australia

When you think of culture you likely think of art, music, language, and food, but rarely about play.

How we play and what we learn from playing are among the first and most enduring exposures to culture we have in our lives.

By purposefully translating our cultural stories into play-based experiences we empower children to engage with their history and culture.

We will examine the pedagogical underpinnings of the Tim and Gina Fairfax Discovery Centre (National Museum of Australia) to help the audience identify play in the stories of their own collections, and thereby translate those stories into play.

12:30 (BST)

Bridging Heritage and Innovation

Discover how Casa Batlló’s Apprenticeship Programme merges heritage conservation with digital innovation to train the next generation of cultural heritage professionals. Amilcar Vargas shares insights on implementing a hybrid learning model that enhances educational and professional opportunities, utilizing digital tools to transform traditional apprenticeships. Learn about the program’s success in fostering international collaboration and its impact on participants’ career trajectories.

13:00 (BST)

What We Can Learn from Learning Programmes in Scottish Prisons

In this talk we will share the story of our journey delivering learning programmes in two Scottish Prisons and the lessons we’ve learned so far about the elements which are key to success as well as the challenges to overcome. We’ll explore the importance of collaboration within the setting of a community of circumstance and how these lessons can be applied to wider outreach settings.

13:30 (BST)

A Khaleeji Story: Shifting to a Local-first Video Content Strategy

As a museum, how do you hone in on *your* unique identity? This isn’t a presentation about branding, but at Qatar Museums, we discovered the power of stepping into our own voice and visual language. Sharing the authentic stories from our specific point of view transformed our strategy and showed our audiences that our captivating content is something that we (and only we!) can offer the world.

14:00 (BST)

Sponsored Presentation : Art Fund

14:30 (BST)

Break

15:00 (BST)

Creating Meeting Points in Museums

The beating heart of MultakaOxford are the people involved. For 4 years, over 150 people have collaborated and volunteered on the project to co-create an innovative programme of exhibitions, events, workshops and conferences. In this session we present two Multaka case studies from from the last 12 months. ‘Pieces of Me’ is a project with Palestinian communities in the UK and Palestine textile artists based in Ramallah refugee camp. The School Box project looks at the co-creation of resources for a local primary school teaching about migration. We explore how the approach works in practice and hear directly from volunteers.

15:30 (BST)

Welcome to the Haus of Holbein

Welcome to the real ‘Haus of Holbein’! Royal Collection teamed up with SIX the Musical to find ways to engage young audiences. Diverse communities engaged with a drawing and costume handling workshop which connected the lyrics from SIX the Musical with historical portraits of Henry VIII’s Queens, in the actual ‘Haus of Holbein’. Participants discussed how these Queens may have green sleeves, but their lipstick is rebellious red. Discover more about how SIX the Musical plans to work with young people at other galleries, and how this new partnership is enabling Royal Collection Trust to develop meaningful learning experiences.

16:00 (BST)

Creative Youth Engagement with English Heritage: Building Futures

Youth voice is at the heart of English Heritage. Young people are leading and participating in projects across the country, and holding positions of governance, actively contributing to and shaping the future of heritage. They are highlighting themes that resonate, relevant to contemporary social issues and using creativity as a form of communicating heritage narratives with others. We’ll explore our participation model, which is breaking down barriers to access, increasing reach and offering diverse young people opportunities to share their authentic perspectives on our shared heritage. Here careers are being built, skills increased, wellbeing improved and heritage enjoyed and valued.

16:30 (BST)

Band Together: A Consortium Model for Neurodiverse Programming

What makes a great museum visit for neurodiverse visitors? How can institutions with limited staff capacity create meaningful, sustainable experiences for specialized audiences? Authors of a practical handbook for sensory-friendly cultural programming share insights from their journey to connect with neurodiverse learners and describe how The Dallas Sensory Consortium, a pioneering partnership between cultural and clinical institutions, can serve as a model to empower others with similar goals. Prepare to discover why you should buy an ice fishing tent, how pom-poms can drive data collection, and how to “start your own band.”

Day Two: 17 July 2024

All times shown are BST (Time in London)

12:00 (BST)

Beyond art vs. science: enhancing capabilities in STEM with contemporary art.

Why should future STEM professionals learn about contemporary art? We often encounter students who feel a need to express preference for one discipline over the other – to choose science or art, but are scientist and artists actually that different? Why is there such a divide between these disciplines? And, what can we, as the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia do about it? With this in mind, the MCA Learning team rethought our approach to STEM. Incorporating Australian syllabuses for both science and art, we aimed to create a cross-disciplinary resource that closes the illusory divide and champions the Art in STEAM.

12:30 (BST)

Empowered evaluation: Programs, educators and reflection

Reflection and evaluation are at the heart of great programming. It’s how we grow as educators, evolve our practice and deepen the experiences we create to engage others. Explore how the Museum of Australian Democracy supports the ongoing professional development of its Museum Educators in order to building knowledge, grow skills and instil self-reflection over time. Discover practical, inclusive tools for undertaking observations, targeting presenter techniques and promoting self-reflection in team members. Explore our unique approach to ongoing team professional development as we invest in our Educators as learners through Slow Looking Professional Development tasks and challenges.

13:00 (BST)

The Y in your museum's DNA: Young people!

Enough talk. Time for action. Time to put young people in the driver’s seat. We need to take them more seriously. They are the future. They own the future. During this presentation you will receive useful tips to make young people part of the DNA of your organization, from the first step they take into the museum to their participation in the board of director.

13:30 (BST)

Briklyoung & Young Ambassadors: co-creative youngsters in Musea Brugge

For several years now, Musea Brugge has focused on active involvement of young people aged between 16 and 26. The central idea here is the target group’s ownership of every project in which they can participate. The younsters steer and determine the content of these trajectories. Participation and co-creation are the building blocks for three pillars: the artistic team of ‘Briklyoung’, the ‘Young Ambassadors’ who make recommendations to the staff and follow the activities for several months. And the collaboration with education in tailor-made projects. Linked to the exhibition programme, this produced surprising collaborations and interesting results between 2019 and 2024.

14:00 (BST)

Children's Boards: Learning from children to create better museums

Museum professionals can learn essential skills for their work from children. Celebrating failure, connecting fully with the present and with nature, finding abundance where others only see scarcity of resources, living constantly from play, not fearing risk and creating the future, adopting a caring mentality where everyone is welcome, attentive listening, being open to the unexpected and to your instincts, etc. Traditionally museums operate from their education and engagement departments in a unidirectional way where the museum teaches and the public learns. When the perspective is changed and it becomes possible for children, for example, to teach us, the reality of the museum changes completely.

14:30 (BST)

Break

15:00 (BST)

TBC

15:30 (BST)

Cultivating Creativity: Next Gen Creatives

How can a museum provide new employability pathways for young people who wouldn’t normally get access to a museum career? In this workshop, we’ll explore how we tried to answer this question through our brand new Next Gen Creatives employability programme for young creatives aged 18-25 living in the London borough of Islington.

16:00 (BST)

Youth as Participatory Designers of Indigenous Mixed Reality Science Exhibits

Join us for a deep dive into how we can reimagine museum spaces through the lens of rightful presence, a justice-centered framework vital to engaging marginalized communities in museum spaces. Learn how we are using participatory co-design strategies to engage Indigenous youth and families in developing Indigenous perseptive-centered science exhibits. We will share how mixed reality technology can afford opportunities for centering Indigenous narratives and promoting a greater sense of belonging.This session offers insights into how to engage in exhibit co-design in ways that can transform institutions into equitable spaces where all voices are celebrated.

16:30 (BST)

Cooking Up Science, History, and Community in the Museum

What does food have to do with science, history, and community? Everything, of course! Learn how a multi-museum complex in a National Historic Landmark cooked up a teaching kitchen that blends learning, collections, and community partners. Join our table for tips on testing curriculum, building partnerships, navigating safety, and working with food-insecure audiences. See how food-based initiatives can expand audiences, generate new revenue, and invite more partners into the kitchen.