fbpx
Subscribe

Search Museum Next

Museums, Health & WellbeingSummit

Schedule

31st January 2022

12:00 (GMT)

Wellbeing with Vincent

The Van Gogh Museum wants to make the art and life of Vincent van Gogh accessible to a diverse audience. Van Gogh’s mental illness is an important part of his story and we felt it was about time we addressed it more openly! Developing a ‘mental health program’, together with young adults and health professionals, we want to make a positive contribution to their wellbeing. With Vincent as a starting point, we aim to foster dialogue, offer creative tools, and embrace diversity.

12:30 (GMT)

A Year of Mental Well-Being

In 2022, ArtScience Museum will be launching the season of mental health and wellbeing to generate awareness and conversations on topics relating to mental health. The Exhibitions and Education teams at ArtScience Museum will share how ArtScience Museum is raising awareness and initiating conversations on mental health and wellbeing, via a series of carefully curated exhibitions and programmes. By drawing on scientific knowledge and the emotional impact brought about by artworks and exhibited content, this upcoming season of mental health and wellbeing at ArtScience Museum aims to create a climate of healing for its visitors.

13:00 (GMT)

Supporting Mental Wellbeing at Kew Palace

In 2021, Kew Palace staged George III: The Mind Behind the Myth, an exhibition focussed on history’s most famous psychiatric patient. Community groups and lenders contributed to the show, creating a powerful exploration of mental ill health at a time when the UK is undergoing a mental health crisis. Visitor Hosts were trained through a partnership with CALM and a new model for supporting staff with challenging content was developed and piloted. This work resulted in powerful visitor experiences and a more open conversation with visitors, and the model can be easily adapted to other areas of museum work.

13:30 (GMT)

Art Helps

Hear about two programmes delivered by the National Galleries of Scotland where art is used to help children, young people and their familes to feel calm, distracted, absorbed, enjoyment and achievement. Working in hospital, schools and youth services settings this inspiring and feel good session will share with you what we did, what happened and what we learned.

14:00 (GMT)

A Gif Festival about Anxiety

It is said that nearly 1/5 people suffer from an anxiety disorder. And that number is rising. What is causing this madness? Is it technology, is it media, is it stress, is it being plugged in 24/7?  We invited artists and illustrators from around the world to explore what anxiety means to them and found some very surprising results. Gif Fest is a multi-media exhibition which showcases these amazing works. Our aim is to make it OK to talk about Anxiety and try to look at the world through a different lens…

14:30 (GMT)

Break

14:45(GMT)

Playful strategies for supporting children’s emotional wellness

Children are facing deep emotional stress as they navigate the complexities of COVID-19, racial unrest, and environmental degradation. These stresses have long-lasting impacts on children’s health and wellness that fall disproportionately on Black and Brown children and children with disabilities. Museums are experts in fostering emotional experiences, but have not always committed to supporting visitors’ long-term emotional wellness. This session shares research and concrete examples of how the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh is supporting children’s emotional wellness by providing intentional opportunities to practice empathy and resilience, building children’s capacity to persist through frustrations they encounter in their daily lives.

15:15 (GMT)

Sensory Journeys

Experience how Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums are reaching beyond our walls and connecting with Special Educational Needs Disability (SEND), Profound Multiple Learning Disability (PMLD), and hard-to-reach disadvantaged audiences, through innovative digital sensory story telling sessions where you create the sights, sounds, smells, and tastes to bring the stories to life, using materials easily found or made at home. Find out how these stories and their supporting resources help all audiences with their health and wellbeing by offering inclusive and meaningful experiences through sensory engagement.

15:45 (GMT)

Using trauma sensitive mindfulness in museums

Mindfulness and museums are the perfect coupling and cultural collections are wonderful resources to teach this lifelong wellbeing skill. Recent research has shown that some forms of mindfulness training can be problematic with people who have experienced trauma. What can museums do to ensure they offer safe practices when working with audiences. Louise will talk about the principles of trauma-sensitive mindfulness and practical ways museums can apply these when working with people and collections.

16:15 (GMT)

Meet The Met’s new podcast on art and wellness

Seek to calm your mind and find inspiration? Meet Frame of Mind, an intimate new podcast from The Met, featuring uplifting personal stories from diverse individuals about how art supports well-being, especially during times of struggle and stress. It also explores how museums can better support and include broader communities and their lived experience in practical, immediate ways. Hear about the project’s conception and formation, how it centers the voices of the public at its heart (including artists, activists, a horticulturalist, doctor, and meditation practitioner), and how it welcomes new audiences to discover their own connections though related articles, interviews, social campaigns, and other resources.

1st February 2022

12:00 (GMT)

Art Conversation to Reduce Social Isolation

At the start of the pandemic, museum professionals had the idea to package the museum experience and send it to homes but distribution and logistics made this idea hard to realize. Come hear how The Met partnered, in April 2021, with a food delivery program to create ‘Your Met Art Box,’ a monthly delivery where The Met shares its permanent collection, art conversation and art making experiences with over 1000 local seniors and volunteers in New York, all aimed at promoting intergenerational wellbeing and reducing social isolation.

12:30 (GMT)

Connections Through Collections: How museums can impact the lives of those living with dementia

House of Memories is the world-leading museum-led dementia awareness training programme that supports people living with dementia, their families, carers and communities. Delivered by National Museums Liverpool and partners across the UK and internationally, it aims to create memorable experiences for everyone, and is designed to support professionals to provide person-centred care for those living with dementia. In this presentation, we will discuss what makes House of Memories successful, as well as the ways that museum collections can help to create connections and be powerful drivers for stimulating memory and conversation for those with dementia and their families.

13:00 (GMT)

Stress reduction in doctors in training through engagement with Art

At the Groninger Museum we believe that by working together with partners such as a medical centre, we as a museum can design better (educational) programs that fit special needs and improve health & well being. By collaborating in multiple projects the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) – the largest and only academic hospital in the North – and the Groninger Museum came up with programs to p.e. reduce isolation, or train medical students and doctors in training in becoming better doctors through engaging (observing, listening and looking) with art. Our latest project is a program to reduce stress for specifically doctors in training through engagement with Art.

13:30 (GMT)

Discos, walks and wellbeing: Supporting older adults to live well in lockdown

How do you engage with older adults at a time when meeting in person is no longer possible? How do you support those who are lonely and isolated to engage with museums and get physically active when they cannot leave the house?

14:00 (GMT)

Combatting loneliness and promoting wellbeing at the museum

Museums have long understood their strength as social spaces and places that contain ‘things that matter’, but how can this reach those experiencing loneliness and isolation? As loneliness is increasingly recognised as a social challenge, how can museums contribute to making a difference? This session explores the potential for museums to contribute to tackling loneliness, particularly in older people, focusing on a series of programmes at the University of Cambridge Museums (UCM) – and considers what we learnt from finding new ways to continue connecting people when COVID meant we could no longer bring people together in our museums, and what we can build on as we consider the future of our work with older people.

14:30 (GMT)

Break

14:45 (GMT)

A Widening Circle: Social Emotional Toolkits

In the face of the crises of 2020, SAAM chose to step closer in. We listened to our communities’ needs, connected across our urban networks, and rerouted resources. In collaboration with a playwright, an art therapist, and community service organisations, we created and distributed Social Emotional Learning Toolkits, free-of-charge. These guided journaling resources and artwork reproductions connect our neighbours with themselves and with their loved ones. The circle continues to widen as we begin distributing these in rural communities throughout the US and contemplate a new toolkit that aims to support communication across difference.

15:15 (GMT)

Hauora (Wellbeing) and the Visitor Experience

Te Manawa Museum, a museum working beyond boundaries, is a regional museum in Aotearoa New Zealand. Using a hauora (wellbeing approach), we focus our engagement with visitors on four key pillars. These are taha tinana (physical), taha wairua (spiritual), taha hinengaro (mental), and taha whānau (family). These four components as described by Sir Mason Durie and his work Te Whare Tapa Whā, provide the platform for our work with our communities. A hauora approach shifts the museum experience from being a transactional exchange to a potentially transformational engagement allowing our visitors to see the museum reflect their own values, experiences and stories organically.

15:45 (GMT)

Artful Moments

We all lived with a range of feelings during a time of stay at home orders, but for some of our community’s more vulnerable people, it was a time of isolation. Where we once thought zoom was a short-term, stop-gap measure to continue programming, we have learned that it can be so much more. Artful Moments is a program that began by providing persons with dementia with opportunities to experience art and shared experiences with loved ones, and has since grown to include many audiences and online delivery as well as in-galley programs. We will share our findings with you.

16:15 (GMT)

Museums connect and satisify different "US"

We all know connection is important for improving mental health in modern society. Creating connection between museum and people is one of the main mission for museum educators. In my opinion, museum educators can show people how to connect, but the real connection need to be created by people. It is important for them to take action and make connection spontaneously. The museum is a place for them to connect and practice, they need to learn and conduct in daily life. When every single person knows how to make connections happen, they find their ways to search for mindfulness, happiness and fulfillment.

2nd February 2022

12:00 (GMT)

Art on the Mind:

How might arts engagement help people living with dementia and their care partners? Since 2010 the Frye Art Museum in Seattle, Washington has been at the forefront of museum programming for this community, illustrating how arts engagement can bring joy, respect, and dignity to people living with dementia while de-stigmatising the disease.

12:30 (GMT)

Creating Opportunities for Mindfulness Anywhere

Mindfulness really can be found anywhere and in any moment! Entering a fully present, calm, and focused state of being begins with slowing down and museums lend themselves so well to the many access points to this. Learn about five practical approaches to creating a mindful experience from a wellness practitioner of nearly 20 years and Manager of the Mindful Museum Programs at the North Carolina Museum of Art. The strategies discussed in this session can be applied broadly and will help inform how you can specifically create or expand these types of offerings at your institution.

13:00 (GMT)

Building Art & Resilience Foundations

As cultural organisations begin to turn toward or deepen their attention to programming for community wellbeing, it’s vital that we move with care and ongoing reflection. How can we leverage our strengths while acknowledging our limitations? How can we develop programs that empower rather than exploit? Using the Wex’s Art & Resilience suite of programs, I’ll share some of what I’ve learned over the years, how I’ve shifted course, and my best advice for those who would like to begin similar programmatic practices.

13:30 (GMT)

Children, Grief and Loss

Join the Jewish Museum London to hear about their approach of using the collection to help children and young people explore and discuss the difficult topics of grief and loss. Based in the story of a Holocaust survivor who lost his entire family and openly spoke about this loss with children during his lifetime, this new workshop, developed in 2021 when so many children experienced loss for the first time due to Covid-19, uses items from the collection and training from Grief Encounter to help children openly discuss this mental health topic.

14:00 (GMT)

Museum as a wellness resort for the senses : learning from disabilities

What can museums learn from visitors with disabilities? How does their experience and expertise reshape the way we understand art? Can it enrich the experience for every visitor? The Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven (the Netherlands) is a museum for contemporary art and has been working on inclusion for years. But their new collection presentation Delinking and Relinking challenged their way of working drastically. Marleen Hartjes shares the insights in this inclusive design process where the senses and polyphonic storytelling play a key role.

14:30 (GMT)

Break

14:45 (GMT)

Supporting Museum Staff in a Trauma-Infused World

Museums today confront a variety of social, political, environmental concerns and challenges. While necessary, these efforts are not without consequence for museum and culture sector employees. What happens when the commonplace stresses of work and life move beyond the interpersonal or organisational into trauma-based ones, and staff must confront and cope with such realities? In this workshop, hear how the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History partnered with the Institute for Disaster Mental Health at the State University of New York at New Paltz to confront such challenges and how your organisation can begin this process as well.

15:15 (GMT)

Well-Being at the Museum starts with Us

A chain is always as strong as its weakest link. A museum is only as strong as the individuals working for the museum. When each and every individual is seen, valued, and supported in their own organisation; if we all contribute with our individual talents and goals, the organisation will develop strengthened and authentically, and all our partners will benefit. In such an atmosphere, everybody grows beyond the structures of the organisation, and simultaneously enjoys JOMO (Joy of Missing Out). Instead of trend hopping inside and outside the museum, everybody contributes with their own skills and interests in authentic strength.

15:45 (GMT)

Handling Hard History

We usually separate ourselves from the objects we handle, preserve, and interpret. We make sure the objects are properly stored and exhibited and that the stories we share are authentic. Sometimes the separation fails, and things get overwhelming. We are confronted with the harsh history of some of these objects. Hear the perspective of a seasoned museum professional and engage in thoughtful discussion about how we are personally affected and how we can cope.

16:15 (GMT)

The Happy Place

Without staff and volunteers, museums would not be able to survive. So why does the sector so often neglect the wellbeing of the people who keep it alive? Sadly, we all know examples of workplaces with unhappy staff, toxic behaviours, and bullying cultures. This session will explore how a toxic culture and lack of care for staff wellbeing can make museums unhappy places for staff, have damaging effects on museum workers, and stifle creativity and ambition. The presentation will call out toxic practice, advocate for prioritising staff wellbeing, and show how we can transform museums into dream places to work.