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Future of Museum Storytelling

Schedule

Choose Day

7th November 2019

9:00

Registration

09:30

Welcome

09:45

StorytellerFromTheFuture

How is one immersed in the “real”? What can the documentary art form tell us about real world, people and situations representations? Exploring new venues in interactive, immersive, storytelling the experience RIOT asks: how would you fare if you were inadvertently caught up in a riot and couldn’t get away? Would you panic? Would you be able to remain calm and maneuver through a fraught situation? Karen Palmer’s interactive film is a cop in full riot gear who demands to know where you’re going. The same facial recognition technology that powers Riot has been put to use by governments in Berlin and China to track individuals suspected of terrorism, and was enlisted in a recent controversial attempt to label people as gay or straight based on their facial features. Karen Palmer explores the intersections of storytelling, filmmaking and ensuring emerging technology becomes widely available to ordinary people.

10:30

Shaping Museum Stories with Neuroscience

In Spring 2017, the Peabody Essex Museum took the unprecedented step of employing the museum world’s first neuroscientist in residence.

The goal of the Neuroscience Initiative is to enhance visitor engagement. Toward that end, they draw on findings from the neuroscience literature to inform their design strategies for creating art experiences. As all experience is a product of brain function, they hypothesize that learning more about how the brain works will allow them to generate more engaging experiences of art and culture in PEM’s galleries.

Tedi Asher will share what she and PEM have learnt from this pioneering work.

11:00

Panel: Making Digital Stories

Join a panel of digital experts as we talk about digital storytelling and the tech that is reshaping narrative both online and on the gallery floor.

12:00

Lunch

13:15

Sponsors Presentation

13:30

How tech can bridge the arts access divide

It is only recently that the country’s largest museums have begun to seriously consider the fact that their collections should better reflect the demographics of their communities.

The tide is turning. Yet, there is still a gap when it comes to diverse communities entering these spaces. Barriers which are physical, economic and more keep them out. Additionally, most don’t feel these spaces are ‘for’ them. Technology has the ability to open doors (virtual and real) and expose those who are most disenfranchised to all of the benefits which are connected to the art.

This chat will focus on those who are moving the needle in this space and how others can adopt their best practices.

14:00

TBC

14:30

Practical storytelling for the incurably curious

How do we approach storytelling on digital platforms in a way that makes best use of the various mediums available and competes against all the other content around to grab people’s attention and hold it?

In this talk, we’ll share our editorial approach and how we go about finding the right time, place, and method to tell a story.

This approach has enabled us to better connect with people and to fulfil our aims as an organisation – it’s also encouraging people to visit in person too.

15:00

Break

15:30

What's a museum for?

Seth Godin, author of 19 worldwide bestsellers, brings us tales from the revolution. Now that your patrons, members and visitors have a thousand alternatives via the phone in their pocket, how will you serve them? By examining who the experience is for and the change we seek to make, we can turn the digital revolution into an opportunity, not a threat.

Marketing isn’t advertising, it’s the work we do and the way we do it. And this moment in time is the perfect opportunity to show up and make a ruckus.

A self-professed museum nerd, Godin will challenge us to amplify our work, turning the museum experience into everything that we need it to be.

 

8:30

Doors Open

9:30

5 Elements of Story Telling at the Hip Hop Museum

At the opening night of the Hip Hop Museum DC, the visitors and presenters and inductees created another layer of the experience that went beyond the exhibit. They talked to each other. Strangers stood around exhibits and debated, shared personal stories and relived memories connected to the collection. After the closing of the original exhibition, visitors, fans and artists were asked to send their stories via social media and a bank of oral and visual histories was built that will follow the exhibit and grow with it at each new location. 5 layers of storytelling existed in this experience. The exhibit began the conversation, experts and narrators shared their own perspectives and the audience was able to join in with the narrators and each other to round out the experience.

10:30

Break

11:00

Designing compelling museum stories

Join a panel of experts as we discuss how museums can design compelling stories.

12:00

Lunch

13:15

Sponsor Presentation

13:30

Whose Story? Inclusivity in Storytelling

How are institutions shaping their programming to reflect an increasingly pluralistic museum-going public? As audience demographics continue to shift, representation matters—particularly in highly diverse cities like Philadelphia. Storytelling can become a tool for bringing to light varied and often underrepresented narratives, and can foster empathy and connection.

A Philadelphia-based arts funder and a professional storyteller share approaches to imaginative and inclusive storytelling in institutional contexts, with case studies from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Temple University’s Temple Contemporary art gallery, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

14:00

Trans Stories in the Museum

Learn about an exceptional exhibition and programming that involved bringing the stories of transgender and nonbinary individuals into a museum and ultimately transforming aspects of the institution, as well as building continuing relationships between and among museum workers at all levels and local transgender communities. Based on exciting and moving oral histories, this presentation will include practical strategies as well as theoretical perspectives.

14:30

Rethinking the way we tell stories and who is invited to tell them

The creative programmes of reinvention and reinterpretation at the Pitt Rivers Museum show a much-loved Victorian space challenging perceptions of museums and galleries. We aim to be of personal relevance to every visitor and to welcome conversations about problematic pasts and presents to forge new, less violent futures.

This year in particular, that reinvention has become a quiet revolution, a year of transformation in how we told our story and invited others to tell theirs. We’re working with forced migrants to change the way we tell stories, offering opportunities to develop workplace skills, wellbeing and confidence in their new home. We worked with the Maasai here in the museum, and in contact with their elders via social media, to improve the way we talk about objects in the collections – and understand how some we hold are problematic. We’ve shared powerful photographs of memorials to the 1994 Rwandan genocide: Giving voice to the makers and caretakers seeking to remember the past and find healing to unimaginable pain.

By pairing unusual objects associated with health and the person, we’re finding creative ways to improve and humanise the everyday objects in our health system. In truth, we believe in caring for each other as much as caring for things.

To do that, we’re facing up to our history. We’re bringing in voices that many institutions, including ourselves, have silenced in the past.

15:00

Break

15:30

Critical Thinking and Crucial Conversations

What role can speculative design play in having crucial socially engaged conversations with your audience? How can you encourage critical thinking in young people through art and design? In this talk, Aisling Murray, Exhibitions Manager from Science Gallery Dublin will showcase the innovative ways they communicate with their target audience of 15-25 year olds and how to effectively use your medium to translate conversations into engaging experiences with your audience.

16:00

Radical Exhibitions: Uplifting Community Voices

One time, we brought together a group over 4x the size of our entire staff to create an opportunity for our community to share their voices on a single local issue. Hear the lessons we learned, the mistakes we’re embarrassed to share, and the framework we developed to make it all possible. Discover how to amplify the voices of a community and inspire action through radical community storytelling and rigorous collaborative design.