Dr Amber Johnson - MuseumNext

Dr Amber Johnson

Founder, The Justice Fleet

As a scholar/artist/activist, Dr. Johnson’s aims to define the language, exigency, sound, and aesthetics of various social movements. Her research and activism focus on performances of identity, protest, and social justice in digital and lived spaces.

As a polymath, her mixed-media artistry involves working with metals, recycled and reclaimed goods, photography, poetry, percussion, and paint to interrogate systems of oppression. Dr. Johnson’s academic teaching and research directly inform her creative process. Illuminating systems of oppression in the classroom for over a decade, Amber finds that art transcends language and helps students and audiences alike view oppression and social justice from alternative spaces.

Thus, she uses several artistic elements within the classroom, as well as her own creative process outside of the classroom to help deepen her commitment to activism and social justice. Amber began working with metals, paint, and photography in 2008, and added recycled and reclaimed goods in 2014. She began teaching photography and installation art in 2011.

As a member of AndroBeat, she plays percussion. As the creator of The Justice Fleet, Dr. Johnson wanted to experiment with mobile museums and social justice inquiry, ethnography, and art activism as methodology to address social injustice and urban engagement.

The mobile museums, housed inside of box trucks, go into different communities to talk about social justice, self-love, community, and healing through intergroup dialogue, play, and art activism.

Connect with Amber:

Speaking at...

Revolution Requires Forgiveness

MuseumNext USA

Portland Art Museum

How do you fight back against injustice and hatred? Amber Johnson is on a mission to start a dialogue about radical forgiveness, going into neighborhoods to engage their communities in discussions about implicit and explicit bias, social identity, and communicating across difference.

Her Justice Fleet is a series of interactive exhibits, housed inside box trucks, that foster communal healing through art, play, and dialogue.

Can one person make a difference and start a social justice revolution? Can the Justice Fleet use forgiveness as a tool to create dialogue between diverse audiences and what can museums learn from radical forgiveness?